My Ocrevus Odyssey

I am frequently asked about my current MS medication regiment, so this is a good time to catch up my readers. On September 20, 2017, I wrote about my first dose of Ocrevus:

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My MS has changed over the years – originally diagnosed as “relapsing-remitting,” Dr. Stevens now classifies it as “relapsing-progressive.” Progressive forms of MS have fewer treatments available, but this spring, a new one entered the field: Ocrevus – ocrelizumab. News stories showed promising results, and though our goal is for this medication to help prevent further progression, I can’t help hoping for a smidgen of improvement. Yesterday, I had my first half dose, and the second half will come in two weeks. Then, I will receive this infusion once every six months.

What will it do? I don’t know. I can tell you that my only reaction was a bit of an itchiness and redness that was zapped with Benadryl. So it is that September 20, 2017, marked the first page in this chapter of my medical saga – time will tell what the other pages hold.
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The immediate part that came next had absolutely nothing to do with the new medication, though I first thought it did. That itchiness and redness, then hives that followed? My thick, dark, curly hair (with natural silver streaks) had been hiding something I had never experienced: head lice. We traced back the source, and it has since been dealt with (not in our house, church, or school), and my dear husband assisted me in winning the fight against the nasty buggers. Once my locks were louse-free, I had them chopped two inches shorter, helping me avoid tangles and other issues. So…the second half of my first Ocrevus dose came about four weeks after the first, and those four weeks were no picnic.

Because of the unrelated craziness, it was difficult to tell if the medication was making a difference in my health. With this medication formulated for one infusion every six months, I do appreciate that I don’t have to go in as often or treatments. Is it effective? I can tell you that that the debilitating tongue and jaw problems (hypoglossal and mandibular neuralgia) that hit me two years ago have not returned. This is indeed HUGE.

Three months have now passed since my third Ocrevus treatment. I do take other daily medications in relation to symptoms, but I feel like I’m at as level of a spot as I’ve been for a while. I must admit that when I first started this medication, I had truly hoped to see a few glimmers of improvement. What I think I have found is a more solid line that may be slowing down progression. MRI scans have shown no additional scars in my brain, and we did find scarring in my spinal column… it was encouraging, in some ways, to find that there was a clear reason for some difficulty walking. Did those scars come before or after Ocrevus? I do not know, but I do feel that, paging through the current therapies that fight this MonSter, Ocrevus is the one that serves me best.

Several years ago, I was an example patient for a medical school course Dr. Stevens was teaching. After I shared my symptoms and they guessed my diagnosis, he shared that my disease was trying to progress. He said he’d give this an 8 on a scale of 1-10, with how fast it was trying to move. And this would explain why he had tried so many options. In November, my husband and I had a consultation with the director of the IU MS Center in Indianapolis, and I was encouraged that he agrees completely with Dr. Stevens. The trail thus far has been appropriate, and of two medications that could help me, Ocrevus is the best choice for me.

So for those who ask how this is going for me, the answer continues to be a process. It has involved a fine-tooth comb, patience, education, faith, and partnership. As I continue travelling this odyssey, I will certainly share snippets of life. The next blog post proves to be a fun one, “Knight Rider.” Is it an 80’s series about a talking car? Likely not, but stay tuned…

Author: Angie

I am a wife, a mother, a writer and a child of God. Since 1997, I've lived with multiple sclerosis, and I find that when life slows down, I am able to see more of the lessons that God has for me to learn.

18 thoughts on “My Ocrevus Odyssey”

  1. Hi Angie, so glad to hear of the new treatment and happy it seems to be doing what it is supposed to do! That must have been terrible having those horrible little monsters in your hair. I am sorry that you have MS, but I am interested in your blog and pray daily for your progress! Love, Betty

  2. I really appreciated this careful explanation of your journey.
    It must be comforting to have a better understanding of what is going on and know you are doing the right thing in your circumstances.
    Blessings and peace as you keep on keeping on!

  3. Thanks for sharing, Angie! I am so thankful for this Body of Christ, that we can be a support and encouragement to others. V

  4. Angie, you are so special. Your attitude and positive thinking, and faith and trust in the Lord, is such a wonderful example to have and live by. I remember you always in my daily prayers. I love you. Aunt Karen

  5. Angie, You are a great storyteller, even when talking about medication. Hope this continues to help you. Your attitude is always an inspiration.

  6. This is so good to hear Angie. We hope this new medicine really continues to work for you with minimal side effects. You’re still in our prayers, continue to be strong.

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