Gen Con 50 – Views from the Chair (preview)

 

As the final summer before our daughters leave for college approaches its end, we’re preparing for one last adventure. And I’m looking forward to sharing these experiences on this blog!

Coming later this week – Gen Con 50: Views from the Chair. The four of us will be attending Gen Con, and unlike last year, I will be able to attend the entire week! With 2017 marking the fiftieth anniversary of this gaming convention, many special events and celebrations are scheduled, and it’s nice that we purchased our tickets several months ago. Many of my regular readers may see this as odd, but tickets for most days are sold out. I anticipate crowds everywhere, beyond those of years past.

What will a more crowded Convention Center mean for those of us with mobility issues? Time will tell. In the past, I have been pleased with the way these issues have been tackled, and I anticipate the same. My laptop will come with me to Indianapolis, and I’ll plan to share my experiences throughout the week. What will the Exhibit Hall experiences be like? Hotel? Dining venues? Restrooms and such?

If any of you have questions you’d like me to address, I’d be happy to do so – please share them in the comments below!

(See last year’s notes at https://angieknight.wordpress.com/2016/08/03/gen-con-views-from-the-chair-part-one/)

“The Present” – more than a disability story

Sometimes, a short story or film will come my way, and it just won’t leave my head until I revisit it. And go again… and at least one more time. Here is one such piece of work, an animated piece just over four minutes in length. Though I first viewed “The Present” less than a week ago, I found out that it was released last year, by an animator in Germany, based on a comic strip from Brazil. The story has been translated into several languages, though it can be understood without words. It has since won awards at the presentfifty film festivals around the world. At one such festival in Brazil last November, the comic artist and animator met face-to-face for the first time. (Little side stories like this make the subject even more meaningful to me, proving that subjects like this cross generational, geographical, and cultural lines.)

Please watch this short film – it shares truths about dealing with disability more eloquently than yours truly ever will. I think I need to watch it again now, which means I need to grab a tissue. You may want one also – enjoy!

 

Marching into Awareness

AngiewalkerAh, the month of March. For the past several years, I have been highlighting MS Awareness Month, wearing my “teacher” hat as I explain what MS is (and isn’t). This also gives me the opportunity to more openly share personal struggles of living with multiple sclerosis.

You may (or may not) have noticed something about this blog during March 2016. What was there to notice, you wonder… it seemed rather absent. The irony of last year’s “Awareness Month” is that I was more aware of my confused nervous system/immune system than I had been in the previous eighteen years. After thinking it was a dental issue that caused my mouth to feel as if was being attacked by scads of tiny, flaming pitchforks any time I tried to speak, swallow, and eat, a series of tests and MRI scans led us to the discovery that a major nerve in my tongue was quite confused. I didn’t have a cavity or worse, but the diagnosis came: “hyposlossal neuralgia.” In essence, the main nerve on the left side of my tongue, allowing me to speak and swallow and such, had a short circuit of sorts.

They say that “knowing is half the battle,” but what I really wanted to know was how to function decently despite the uncooperative tongue. For almost a month, we tried different medications to help tame the crazy nerve. The craziest part of the struggle came when medication that tamed the tongue also took away the ability for my legs to move. At all. Because I appreciate the ability to do such things as go to the restroom, this was not appreciated. So… by April, things were tamed enough. But MS Awareness Month had completely passed me by. And I had visited doctor offices and MRI machines in three different cities, very aware of MS.

So that was 2016. 2017 holds different challenges and paths, as my tongue is tamed. Usually, at least. My point here: MS is unpredictable, and those who live with it are “aware,” no matter what month it is. Over the next week or so, I will be sharing about MS in general. I’ll also share about March’s other campaign, “Disability Awareness Month.” My own journey into and through the world of MS and disability is just one story, and I hope to shine a little light to increase awareness for us all.

Gen Con: chair view (part 3)

 

If you follow my blog but not T.R.’s, you likely missed part three of this Gen Con accessibility mini-portrait. As you may have read yesterday, I left Indianapolis at that time to head home and attend a writers conference at Taylor University. But Gen Con continues, going strong as four very full days create those “Best Four Days in Gaming“.

After my views from the chair, here you can find T.R.’s “Views from behind the chair.”

If others have experiences in this area, positive or negative, I’d love to hear about them!

Gen Con – views from the chair (part one)

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Games: a frequent theme of life in the Knight house. My husband T.R. adores games, and our family enjoys them together in many ways. He not only taught a “Game Studies” course last semester at Taylor University last semester, but he helped organize a “Family Game Night” at our church in July. One reason he and I have enjoyed more games together is simple: board and card games create great activities we can experience in full despite disability.

Over the past four or five years, he has also become more a part of the professional side of gaming. Gradually, he started volunteering for a European game company that was to have a booth in Indianapolis. Then he got to know those in the industry better, and he started freelancing, primarily as a proofreader. Fast forward a few years there, and you will find all four of the Knight Family members at Gen Con.

Gen Con, “The Best Four Days in Gaming,” will find scads of people filling the Indianapolis Convention Center, even spilling into Lucas Oil Stadium this year. Estimates predict 60-70,000 attendees this year, making this event the largest Indy tourist attraction of the year, a larger financial boost for the city than the Indy 500 or NCAA finals.

IMG_0657.JPGIMG_0652How does this affect me? We arrived early, as T.R. and our daughters spent time yesterday and today helping set up a booth, where they’ll be working for a few hours each afternoon. With this large of an event, participants also pick up tickets early. And this is the second way the Convention Center really impressed me! After dinner, we decided to see if we could pick up and exchange a few tickets, changes we had made since sign-up a few months ago. A long line, twenty to thirty minutes long, we were told, snaked through a hallway then around a group of turnstiles. We weren’t certain a wheelchair could make those turns, and T.R. saw a sign near the line’s end that read “Special Services.”

The kind, patient folks helped all four of us with our ticket switches! Being in a wheelchair may not hold a lot of bonuses, but this certainly ranked up there. If this was the second, what was the first? It came in January, when Gen Con attendees are first able to reserve hotel rooms. Because we needed to reserve a handicap accessible room, we were allowed to hold a room before the official time window opened. Proof to me that sometimes, one needs to plan ahead. And ask. Also a demonstration of the professional hospitality one can find in our great state.

I already feel more encouraged about tomorrow’s Gen Con time – you’ll be hearing from me then, as I describe my “view from this chair.”