Not sure I’m “Cool,” but I can try…

Be Cool. We Are!” An intriguing theme for Indiana’s Disability Awareness Month. I do govhol dismonthencourage you to take a look at this message, shared by individuals with varying struggles. Governor Holcomb kicked off the month with support, and I appreciate the words he shared. What does it mean to be “cool”? To be “comfortable in your own skin,” he suggests.

As we face disability, either through experience or observation, it inevitably causes us to feel uncomfortable. As I have gone from starting to use a cane fifteen years ago to gradually using other methods of physical support, I have gradually learned to be comfortable in my own skin, so to speak. I first felt that my cane flashed neon lights, then that a walker screamed of weakness. But as a person facing disability, I have certainly learned the importance of helping others like me feel less awkward. A smile and positive words can work wonders. My cane didn’t glow, my walker didn’t scream, and my wheelchair was just fine.

Some disabilities appear outwardly, others are less obvious. When they appear more obvious, I appreciate the Governor’s Council’s advice: “Be Cool. We Are.” Sounds like a good plan! And for those with disabilities that are more hidden (but just as real), this theme may give reason to contemplate… what hidden limitations are faced by those around me? Whatever they may be, I’ll try to be cool.

Author: Angie

I am a wife, a mother, a writer and a child of God. Since 1997, I've lived with multiple sclerosis, and I find that when life slows down, I am able to see more of the lessons that God has for me to learn.

2 thoughts on “Not sure I’m “Cool,” but I can try…”

  1. Dear Angie, I will be 93 in July! I love my walker. It has been my constant companion for about 3 years. I feel comfortable in my skin! Angie, I think you are cool, I have always thought you were cool! Love, Betty

    1. Thank you, Betty! You are such an encouragement to many… my walker is certainly my friend, and it took a bit for me to get used to being comfortable with it while in my early 40s, Got over that pretty quickly, though.

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