Gen Con 50 – View from the Chair (days 3 and 4)

 

Yes, Day 3 of Gen Con came, and though the numbers were technically not larger, it seemed more packed, I think. Yesterday ended later for us, but for a fun reason, as T.R. attended an awards ceremony for the ENnies, the EN World RPG Awards. His “Cyclopaedia” blog was one of five blog nominees for an award, and though it was not a winner, two different games he assisted with did win gold and/or silver awards!

But what were those other snapshots of on Friday? The one plain shot of an elevator wasimg_1390 a reminder of how thankful we are for the elevators and skywalks that allow us to attend events in and around the Convention Center without trying to navigate stairs or crazy twisting ramps. …We hit our first snag here, though, when Thursday evening’s elevator from the skywalk to the Convention Center was dead. And there was nobody to contact, no number to call. We ended up making our way across to a parking garage where we could take an elevator down, then walk along the city street to enter the Convention Center, once we found an entrance on that side that didn’t involve a stairway. Thankfully, it had been repaired by the time we were on the way back from our evening event.

Other events Friday included demo-ing (then purchasing) two new games. One img_1397that excited me to most was Codenames Duet, a cooperative two person version of the popular party game. Yes, it’s a neat game, but what excited me the most wasn’t just the game itself, but the fact that the convention demonstration size of the lettering on the cards was huge… so I could read it from a few feet away without problem! Though the demo sized tiles are not sold, I’m contacting the company to encourage them to make this version available! Small text size on playing cards is one of the more frustrating bits of gameplay I face, and what a beautiful solution this option could be. We shared these thoughts with those running this game room, and I will communicate with the publisher after we’re home.

One little piece of Gen Con I enjoy each year is the balloon sculpture.

 

This year’s Golden Dragon, representing the 50th Anniversary, is quite lovely. More was pieced together each day, and we could view the final celebratory piece on Sunday! (I didn’t attend the final popping.)img_1442

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Bob Ross “The Art of Chill” board game

Saturday evening had also been an extra special game time, with friends gathering in our hotel lobby/breakfast area to share pizza and snacks, then img_1417play new games we had purchased – my favorite was one that is now available at Target stores. If you also grew up watching “The Joy of Painting on PBS, you also may enjoy the game where you earn points for painting fluffy clouds, happy trees, and mighty mountains.  Some of those who gathered were those who rarely meet face-to-face, but know one another via online communications through Innroads Ministries.

Sunday brought one of our favorite parts of the week, the img_1433Christian worship service. This gathering of believers to sing praise, share communion,  and hear a telling message from Tom Vasel. Though the speaker is known in the gaming community as the founder and host of the game review podcast “The Dice Tower,” he is also an ordained minister. His message was right on target with this audience. The three points (as most sermons possess) were simple:

1. Be content. (even when you’re attending an event that shows you so many games and things you “must have.”
2. Listen. In our busy world – and a busy Con also – take time to stop and listen. And Hear. Sometimes, we need reminders to stop talking, to take in messages from others.
3. Rest. This goes hand-in-hand with the previous note to rest… and no, resting does not indicate laziness, but it is necessary physically, emotionally, and spiritually.

We certainly appreciated Tom Vasel’s timely words, and after we left to join the final day img_1445at Gen Con, we prepared to meet with various people, then we had a unique, unexpected lunch that showed another way a business took an “invisible issue” img_1810seriously. At a daughter’s request, we decided to visit “The Walking Waffle Company” in the food court of Circle Center Mall. Their menu offered different meal options – the breakfast waffle with bacon, eggs, and cheese looked lovely, and the chicken waffle sounded fun. I have an unusual, rather annoying allergy: black pepper. As I do at any restaurant, I asked the gentleman taking orders if the chicken or breakfast waffles contained any black pepper. He thoughtfully responded, “The eggs don’t, but several items do, and I’m afraid pepper could  remain on the grill and leach into the eggs.” He then carefully considered and found that the Waffle Club Sandwich should work for me. Not only was he correct there, but I found a new, unexpected treat. I know that food allergies can be tricky, particularly when they’re uncommon. I do appreciate a private restaurant owner, even in a popular food court, taking the time to accommodate a silly allergy.

As we walked toward our room after lunch, a game-editing friend passed us in the hallway. John had injured his foot and was in a wheelchair (where he had not been when I talked with him on Saturday morning). “The world is different from this view – it’s quite… disconcerting.” John then described an interaction he’d had with a taller friend – about 6′ 5″ – and he said they were so far apart that he felt cut off from the rest of the world. Trying to converse with a taller friend woke him up to a different perspective.

Gen Con 50 did hold more than the snippets I described. So many neat conversations with people from around the world, here just a ninety minute drive from our home. Games and costumes and celebrations and more. But me? My “battery” is such that I took a nap each afternoon, while the rest of the family worked at a booth each afternoon. I enjoyed and appreciated the experiences I had – Nice job, Gen Con 2017!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gen Con 50 – Views from the Chair (day 1)

 


Today marked the first actual day of Gen Con, and we have definitely found that a bit of planning helps those “invisible issues” not be issues at all. The convention itself is sold out, and we are thankful for the tickets and reservations we got secured in advance. Even more so, I’m thrilled with support fromimg_1376-1 “Special Services,” offering specific assistance to those with physical needs. Wednesday evening, in fact, I obtained a blue wristband that may help with lines and such in the coming days… I’m not certain this will have an impact on things, but we shall see.

So were things busy in the Convention Center today? Suffice it to say – yes. As in years past, we found that a “plan” helped. We had our list

Andy Looney and me

Andy Looney and me

of booths to visit first, and each of us went to the booths that were most important to him or her. Em visited an artist she has gotten to know, Rach purchased a superhero book and chatted with the author as he signed it (the book was tied in with a game he wrote), T.R. directed us to the booth that sells “scratch and dent” games at wonderful prices, and me? I wished to visit the Looney Labs booth and have a pic with Andy Looney. (We also purchased the new “Chemistry Fluxx.”)

Even as we enjoyed lunch at Noodles, Inc., we found one thing to be very true: people here are kind and thoughtful, for the most part. The wheelchair didn’t seem to be a barrier, just an accepted part of life. I’ll share more tomorrow, also planning to add more photos, fun, and insights. Please let me know if you have questions you’d like to see answered.

Gen Con 50 – Views from the Chair (preview)

 

As the final summer before our daughters leave for college approaches its end, we’re preparing for one last adventure. And I’m looking forward to sharing these experiences on this blog!

Coming later this week – Gen Con 50: Views from the Chair. The four of us will be attending Gen Con, and unlike last year, I will be able to attend the entire week! With 2017 marking the fiftieth anniversary of this gaming convention, many special events and celebrations are scheduled, and it’s nice that we purchased our tickets several months ago. Many of my regular readers may see this as odd, but tickets for most days are sold out. I anticipate crowds everywhere, beyond those of years past.

What will a more crowded Convention Center mean for those of us with mobility issues? Time will tell. In the past, I have been pleased with the way these issues have been tackled, and I anticipate the same. My laptop will come with me to Indianapolis, and I’ll plan to share my experiences throughout the week. What will the Exhibit Hall experiences be like? Hotel? Dining venues? Restrooms and such?

If any of you have questions you’d like me to address, I’d be happy to do so – please share them in the comments below!

(See last year’s notes at https://angieknight.wordpress.com/2016/08/03/gen-con-views-from-the-chair-part-one/)

“The Present” – more than a disability story

Sometimes, a short story or film will come my way, and it just won’t leave my head until I revisit it. And go again… and at least one more time. Here is one such piece of work, an animated piece just over four minutes in length. Though I first viewed “The Present” less than a week ago, I found out that it was released last year, by an animator in Germany, based on a comic strip from Brazil. The story has been translated into several languages, though it can be understood without words. It has since won awards at the presentfifty film festivals around the world. At one such festival in Brazil last November, the comic artist and animator met face-to-face for the first time. (Little side stories like this make the subject even more meaningful to me, proving that subjects like this cross generational, geographical, and cultural lines.)

Please watch this short film – it shares truths about dealing with disability more eloquently than yours truly ever will. I think I need to watch it again now, which means I need to grab a tissue. You may want one also – enjoy!

 

Marching into Awareness

AngiewalkerAh, the month of March. For the past several years, I have been highlighting MS Awareness Month, wearing my “teacher” hat as I explain what MS is (and isn’t). This also gives me the opportunity to more openly share personal struggles of living with multiple sclerosis.

You may (or may not) have noticed something about this blog during March 2016. What was there to notice, you wonder… it seemed rather absent. The irony of last year’s “Awareness Month” is that I was more aware of my confused nervous system/immune system than I had been in the previous eighteen years. After thinking it was a dental issue that caused my mouth to feel as if was being attacked by scads of tiny, flaming pitchforks any time I tried to speak, swallow, and eat, a series of tests and MRI scans led us to the discovery that a major nerve in my tongue was quite confused. I didn’t have a cavity or worse, but the diagnosis came: “hyposlossal neuralgia.” In essence, the main nerve on the left side of my tongue, allowing me to speak and swallow and such, had a short circuit of sorts.

They say that “knowing is half the battle,” but what I really wanted to know was how to function decently despite the uncooperative tongue. For almost a month, we tried different medications to help tame the crazy nerve. The craziest part of the struggle came when medication that tamed the tongue also took away the ability for my legs to move. At all. Because I appreciate the ability to do such things as go to the restroom, this was not appreciated. So… by April, things were tamed enough. But MS Awareness Month had completely passed me by. And I had visited doctor offices and MRI machines in three different cities, very aware of MS.

So that was 2016. 2017 holds different challenges and paths, as my tongue is tamed. Usually, at least. My point here: MS is unpredictable, and those who live with it are “aware,” no matter what month it is. Over the next week or so, I will be sharing about MS in general. I’ll also share about March’s other campaign, “Disability Awareness Month.” My own journey into and through the world of MS and disability is just one story, and I hope to shine a little light to increase awareness for us all.

Gen Con: chair view (part 3)

 

If you follow my blog but not T.R.’s, you likely missed part three of this Gen Con accessibility mini-portrait. As you may have read yesterday, I left Indianapolis at that time to head home and attend a writers conference at Taylor University. But Gen Con continues, going strong as four very full days create those “Best Four Days in Gaming“.

After my views from the chair, here you can find T.R.’s “Views from behind the chair.”

If others have experiences in this area, positive or negative, I’d love to hear about them!

Gen Con – views from the chair (part one)

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Games: a frequent theme of life in the Knight house. My husband T.R. adores games, and our family enjoys them together in many ways. He not only taught a “Game Studies” course last semester at Taylor University last semester, but he helped organize a “Family Game Night” at our church in July. One reason he and I have enjoyed more games together is simple: board and card games create great activities we can experience in full despite disability.

Over the past four or five years, he has also become more a part of the professional side of gaming. Gradually, he started volunteering for a European game company that was to have a booth in Indianapolis. Then he got to know those in the industry better, and he started freelancing, primarily as a proofreader. Fast forward a few years there, and you will find all four of the Knight Family members at Gen Con.

Gen Con, “The Best Four Days in Gaming,” will find scads of people filling the Indianapolis Convention Center, even spilling into Lucas Oil Stadium this year. Estimates predict 60-70,000 attendees this year, making this event the largest Indy tourist attraction of the year, a larger financial boost for the city than the Indy 500 or NCAA finals.

IMG_0657.JPGIMG_0652How does this affect me? We arrived early, as T.R. and our daughters spent time yesterday and today helping set up a booth, where they’ll be working for a few hours each afternoon. With this large of an event, participants also pick up tickets early. And this is the second way the Convention Center really impressed me! After dinner, we decided to see if we could pick up and exchange a few tickets, changes we had made since sign-up a few months ago. A long line, twenty to thirty minutes long, we were told, snaked through a hallway then around a group of turnstiles. We weren’t certain a wheelchair could make those turns, and T.R. saw a sign near the line’s end that read “Special Services.”

The kind, patient folks helped all four of us with our ticket switches! Being in a wheelchair may not hold a lot of bonuses, but this certainly ranked up there. If this was the second, what was the first? It came in January, when Gen Con attendees are first able to reserve hotel rooms. Because we needed to reserve a handicap accessible room, we were allowed to hold a room before the official time window opened. Proof to me that sometimes, one needs to plan ahead. And ask. Also a demonstration of the professional hospitality one can find in our great state.

I already feel more encouraged about tomorrow’s Gen Con time – you’ll be hearing from me then, as I describe my “view from this chair.”

Day 27 – Thirty Days of Thanks – nineteen years and counting

thankful2

Nineteen years ago on this date, the air felt decidedly hot. And quite humid. And very sunny. (Of course it was… it was July in Indiana.)  So what made it memorable? July 30, 1997 was the day of the official word, the day that Dr. Stevens confirmed that the preliminary June diagnosis was correct: I have Multiple Sclerosis.

Nineteen years later, this journey continues. Few wish for struggles, and I admit that I do not enjoy them, but my MS path does indeed contain pieces for which I give thanks. Today’s list will focus on that:

5 things I’m thankful for, highlighted by MS in my life:

  1. Embraced Slowness –I’ve never been super speedy (as my parents and brothers can vehemently attest), but MS has enforced a movement level that has me running races with snails, and sometimes they win. But you know what we’ve discovered? When you refrain from being speedy, you notice and appreciate things you may have missed otherwise. It can be refreshing.
  2. Connections with others –More people than I can count have contacted me for assurance or advice – or commiseration – after receiving a frightening diagnosis. This was never a lesson I had planned to teach, but I’m thankful that I’m able to step in here at times.
  3. Little everyday ADA blessings –I credit the ADA for many bits of blessing, and I am thankful for things like not-too-steep ramps, early boarding for an airplane, and special seats at the theater. I read last year that we are now a part of “Generation ADA” – we have indeed come a long way. I have an understanding here that I never would have before!
  4. Learning the blessing of giving AND receiving –For some of us, giving is a lot simpler, more comfortable, more joyful than receiving. And rightly so… but I have finally realized that by being an appreciative “receiver,” I bless the life of those on the other side of the equation. For a proud and independent type of person, this wasn’t a simple lesson, but I feel that I am experiencing this truth more fully after nineteen years.
  5. Deeper family relationships –Life as it is in the Knight house requires a level of giving, understanding, patience and love that I don’t think would be if not for challenges MS brings our way. My husband and daughters are so very special, and there are bonds within our family that have been strengthened by this thing called MS.

So “Thankful for MS”? Not today. Thankful for (sometimes hidden) blessings that abound? You bet!

 

[Note about “Thirty Days of Thanks”: I continue being thankful, but writing about days 28-30 will actually begin again August 9. As mentioned above, I am indeed slow, and my energy is limited. I will be attending two conferences, and my writing time and energy will be focused there. I love adopting a mental and spiritual posture of thankfulness, and it will be fun to bring my thirty days to a proper close!]

Day 15 – Thirty Days of Thanks – There’s no place like home

home sweet home

I wrote this on Friday the 15th, but due to craziness of luggage, laundry, and anniversary celebration, it wasn’t posted. Here it is, a tiny bit before Day 17.

Today’s 5 Thankful things – Returning home

  1. Fresh streusel – http://www.harbertswedishbakery.com/ Starting our final lake morning with fresh streusel from the nearby Swedish bakery was indeed lovely. (Thank you, T.R., for the bakery trip yesterday!)
  1. Sweet hugs from young nieces – It was nice to see our young nieces, ages 9 and 11, for an entire week. They may be similar, but they are as different as our own two daughters (more, of course, since they’re two years apart rather than thirteen minutes.) It reminded me of our girls’ elementary years, while also helping me appreciate how far Em and Rach have come.
  1. Ahhh, home – How nice it was to step into our own house. Aaaahhhh.
  1. Sleeping in our own bed – Our own mattress, sheets, pillows… so we can be home for our anniversary. Nice.
  1. A home without stairs – I don’t fully appreciate the way we designed our own home until I spend time at a place with plenty of steps. Our stairway-free house is appreciated even more at times like this!

 

Day 7 – Thirty Days of Thanks – physical

disabilitiesThis morning, as I went through normal bits of routine, I couldn’t help but notice a few very obvious snippets of life here that I was very thankful for! Why does that bit of thanks deserve an exclamation point? Well, as you may recall, my “invisible” disability is sometimes very obvious, as MS impedes my dexterity, to put it mildly. So here I’ll share some thankful things that are very real to me.

5 helpful things I’m very thankful for:                      

  1. shower seatChair in the shower – I’m not sure why it took so long for me to figure this out, but last year, my husband and I realized that a shower wasn’t invigorating me, but was exhausting me. After a time or two when I dropped down to the floor, we decided that sitting while showering was worth a try. Boy, did this help!
  1. Bars in the shower grab bars– We’ve had these for almost a decade now, and I appreciate this so much!
  1. toilet gripsHandles around the porcelain “throne” – It is so helpful to have a handhold when sitting on or getting up from the toilet. Not fun to talk about, but even less fun to struggle with when you’re stuck.
  1. Rockerrocker switches and bar light switches – I’m so thankful that our light switches are all this type, so I can hit it with an elbow or palm of my hand, rather than having to hook a toggle switch. For those who have traditional switches, changing to this type is a simple, inexpensive way to add accessibility to a room.
  1. rampSmall ramp near garden – Most of our doors out of our house are at ground level, but our back door has a small step. This was a tiny bit frustrating, but T.R. found a tiny ramp we could order to help fix this stumbling spot. Cool stuff!

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